Archive for June 10, 2019

PM Netanyahu on Iranian Foreign Minister’s statement and acceleration of Iran’s nuclear program – YouTube

June 10, 2019

 

 

Top Iran diplomat warns US it cannot ‘expect to stay safe’

June 10, 2019

Source: Top Iran diplomat warns US it cannot ‘expect to stay safe’

an hour ago

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif speaks during a press conference with his German counterpart Heiko Maas after their talks in Tehran, Iran, Monday, June 10, 2019. Zarif warned the U.S. on Monday that it “cannot expect to stay safe” after launching what he described as an economic war against Tehran, taking a hard-line stance amid a visit by Germany’s top diplomat seeking to defuse tensions. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran’s foreign minister warned the U.S. on Monday that it “cannot expect to stay safe” after launching what he described as an economic war against Tehran, taking a hard-line stance amid a visit by Germany’s top diplomat seeking to defuse tensions.

A stern-faced Mohammad Javad Zarif offered a series of threats over the ongoing tensions gripping the Persian Gulf. The crisis takes root in President Donald Trump’s decision over a year ago to withdraw America from Iran’s 2015 nuclear deal with world powers. Trump also reinstated tough sanctions on Iran, targeting its oil sector.

“Mr. Trump himself has announced that the U.S. has launched an economic war against Iran,” Zarif said. “The only solution for reducing tensions in this region is stopping that economic war.”

Zarif also warned: “Whoever starts a war with us will not be the one who finishes it.”

For his part, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas insisted his country and other European nations want to find a way to salvage the nuclear deal, which saw Iran limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions. But he acknowledged there were limits.

“We won’t be able to do miracles, but we are trying as best as we can to do prevent its failure,” Maas said.

However, Europe has yet to be able to offer Iran a way to get around the newly imposed U.S. sanctions. Meanwhile, a July 7 deadline — imposed by Iran — looms for Europe to find a way to save the unraveling deal.

Otherwise, Iran has warned it will resume enriching uranium closer to weapons-grade levels.

Though Zarif made a point to shake Maas’ hands before the cameras, his comments marked a sharp departure for the U.S.-educated diplomat who helped secure the nuclear deal, alongside the relatively moderate President Hassan Rouhani. They came after Maas spoke about Israel, an archenemy of Iran’s government.

“Israel’s right to exist is part of Germany’s founding principle and is completely non-negotiable,” Maas said. “It is a result of our history and it’s irrevocable and doesn’t just change because I am currently in Tehran.”

Zarif then grew visibly angry, offering a list of Mideast problems ranging from al-Qaida to the bombing of Yemeni civilians he blamed on the U.S. and its allies, namely Saudi Arabia.

“If one seeks to talk about instability in this region, those are the other parties who should be held responsible,” Zarif said.

Zarif’s sharp tone likely comes from Iran’s growing frustration with Europe, as well as the ever-tightening American sanctions targeting the country. Iran’s national currency, the rial, is currently trading at nearly 130,000 to $1. It had been 32,000 to the dollar at the time of the 2015 deal. That has wiped away people’s earnings, as well as driven up prices on nearly every good in the country.

European nations had pledged to create a mechanism called INSTEX, which would allow Iran to continue to trade for humanitarian goods despite American sanctions. However, that program has yet to really take off, something Iran’s foreign ministry spokesman noted before Zarif and Maas spoke to reporters.

“We haven’t put much hope in INSTEX,” spokesman Abbas Mousavi said, according to Iranian state television. “If INSTEX was going to help us, it would have done so already.”

Maas later met Rouhani as well.

Trump, in withdrawing from the deal, pointed that the accord had not limited Iran’s ballistic missile program, or addressed what American officials describe as Tehran’s malign influence across the wider Mideast.

Back when the deal was struck in 2015, it was described it as a building block toward further negotiations with Iran, whose Islamic government has had a tense relationship with America since the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and subsequent hostage crisis.

Some members of Trump’s administration, particularly National Security Adviser John Bolton, previously supported the overthrow of Iran’s government. Trump, however, has stressed that he wants to talk with Iran’s clerical rulers.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will arrive in Tehran on Wednesday as an interlocutor for Trump.

Japan had once purchased Iranian oil, but it has now stopped over American sanctions. However, Mideast oil remains crucial to Japan and recent threats from Iran to close off the Strait of Hormuz, the narrow mouth through which a third of all oil traded by sea passes, has raised concerns.

The semi-official Tasnim news agency reported that Ali Asghar Zarean, deputy head of Iran’s nuclear department, said Tehran had increased the number of its centrifuges to 1,044 at the Fordo underground facility. That’s the maximum allowed under the deal.

Meanwhile, the head of the U.N. atomic watchdog said Monday that Iran had already increased its uranium enrichment activities. Iran previously announced it would quadruple its production of low-enrichment uranium.

“I am worried about increasing tensions over the Iranian nuclear issue,” Yukiya Amano of the International Atomic Energy Agency said. “As I have constantly emphasized, the nuclear-related commitments entered into by Iran under the (deal) represent a significant gain for nuclear verification — I therefore hope that ways can be found to reduce current tensions through dialogue.”

___

Gambrell reported from Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Associated Press writers Karin Laub in Amman, Jordan, and David Rising in Berlin contributed to this report.

 

UK said to have foiled 2015 Hezbollah London bomb plot, then covered it up 

June 10, 2019

Source: UK said to have foiled 2015 Hezbollah London bomb plot, then covered it up | The Times of Israel

Daily Telegraph says Iran-backed terror group stockpiled three tons of ammonium nitrate, but discovery was kept quiet, perhaps in effort not to derail just-signed Iran nuke deal

Hezbollah supporters take part in a rally to mark al-Quds day in Beirut, Lebanon, May 31, 2019. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

Hezbollah supporters take part in a rally to mark al-Quds day in Beirut, Lebanon, May 31, 2019. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

British intelligence in 2015 caught an alleged Hezbollah terrorist stockpiling more than three tons of ammonium nitrate, a common ingredient in homemade bombs, on the outskirts of London, but never divulged the plot, The Daily Telegraph reported Sunday.

The report said the arrest came just months after the UK joined the US and other world powers in signing the Iran nuclear deal and speculated that it was hushed up to avoid derailing the agreement with Tehran, which is the main supporter of the Lebanese Hezbollah group.

Acting on a tip from a foreign intelligence agency, MI5 and the Metropolitan Police raided four properties in North West London, discovering thousands of disposable ice packs containing ammonium nitrate, the Telegraph said.

A man in his forties was arrested on suspicion of plotting terrorism, but was eventually released without charges. The paper quoted “well placed sources” as saying that “the plot had been disrupted by a covert intelligence operation rather than seeking a prosecution.”

An undated photo of Ali Kourani, a naturalized US citizen from Lebanon who allegedly plotted attacks on behalf of Hezbollah in New York City. (screen capture: YouTube)

According to the report, the plot was part of a wider Hezbollah plan to lay the groundwork for future attacks and noted foiled Hezbollah operations in ThailandCyprus and New York. All those plots were made public and were believed to have targeted Israeli interests around the world.

The Telegraph said the Cyprus case was strikingly similar to the one in London. In 2015 in Cyprus, confessed Hezbollah agent Hussein Bassam Abdallah was sentenced to six years in jail after he was found with 8.2 tons of ammonia nitrate in his home. He had reportedly planned to attack Israeli targets.

The Telegraph said its information came after a three-month investigation in which more than 30 current and former officials in Britain, America and Cyprus were approached and court documents were obtained.

The Telegraph said that in Cyprus the ammonia nitrate was also stored in ice packs, saying that they were a convenient, seemingly harmless and easy to transport.

Sources told the Telegraph that the UK plot was at a very early stage and no targets had been selected. It said UK intelligence used to opportunity to try and establish what Hezbollah was up to and so did not disrupt it immediately.

Security Minister Ben Wallace arrives at the Cabinet Office in Whitehall, central London, Saturday March 10, 2018, to attend a meeting to brief on developments in the suspected nerve agent attack on Russian spy double agent Sergei Skripal, in Salisbury, England. (Andrew Matthews/PA via AP)

“MI5 worked independently and closely with international partners to disrupt the threat of malign intent from Iran and its proxies in the UK,” a UK intelligence source told the paper.

“The Security Service and police work tirelessly to keep the public safe from a host of national security threats. Necessarily, their efforts and success will often go unseen,” said Minister of State for Security Ben Wallace.

But the Telegraph speculated that the incident was kept quiet because the US had just signed the Iran nuclear deal.

“It raises questions about whether senior UK government figures chose not to reveal the plot in part because they were invested in keeping the Iran nuclear deal afloat,” the paper said.

The US, under President Donald Trump, has since pulled out of the deal and hit Iran with fresh sanctions.

The paper also raised questions as to why the information was not revealed as the UK debated banning the entire Hezbollah organization earlier this year.

In March, it finally declared Hezbollah’s political wing illegal too after years of distinguishing it from its military wing.

Hezbollah was established in 1982 during the Lebanese civil war and fought a 2006 war with Israel. Its leader, Hassan Nasrallah, regularly threatens to target Israel with thousands of advanced missiles that can reach all major Israeli cities.

The group is considered a terror organization by Israel, the US and the Arab League. The European Union and Australia only designate the group’s military wing as such.

It has been blamed for a string of attacks against Israelis including the 2012 attack on a bus load of Israeli tourists in Bulgaria that killed five, the 1992 bombing of the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires that killed 29, and the 1994 AMIA Jewish center bombing in Buenos Aires that killed 85 people and injured hundreds more.

The aftermath of the 1994 AMIA bombing in Buenos Aires. (Newspaper La Nación (Argentina/Wikipedia Commons)

Britain blacklisted Hezbollah’s military wing in 2008 but had until now made no move against its political wing.

However, British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said the UK now believes that any distinction between its military and political wings “does not exist.”

The move came after the group was included as part of Lebanon’s new government. While the cabinet is headed by Saad Hariri, a Western-backed Sunni politician who has held the job since 2016, Hezbollah made significant gains at the expense of the largest Sunni party and now controls three government ministries.

Tehran is a major supporter of Hezbollah and its “resistance” against the Islamic Republic’s arch foe, Israel.

During the debate, Labour, whose leader Jeremy Corbyn once referred to Hezbollah as his “friends,” said the Home Office had not provided evidence to justify its change in stance on the Iran-backed organization’s political wing.

“Decisions on the proscription of organizations as terror groups are supposed to be made on the advice of civil servants based on clear evidence that those organizations fall foul of the proscription criteria set out in legislation,” Labour said in a statement.

 

UN nuclear watchdog: Iran’s uranium ‘production rate is increasing’ | The Times of Israel

June 10, 2019

Source: UN nuclear watchdog: Iran’s uranium ‘production rate is increasing’ | The Times of Israel

IAEA chief Yukiya Amano warns of rising tension, says ‘essential that Iran fully implements its nuclear-related commitments’ under 2015 deal

Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Yukiya Amano of Japan, addresses the media during a news conference after a meeting of the IAEA board of governors at the International Center in Vienna, Austria, June 4, 2018. (Ronald Zak/AP)

Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Yukiya Amano of Japan, addresses the media during a news conference after a meeting of the IAEA board of governors at the International Center in Vienna, Austria, June 4, 2018. (Ronald Zak/AP)

VIENNA, Austria — The UN’s nuclear watchdog said Monday it was “worried about increasing tensions” over Iran’s nuclear program, after Tehran said it might stop respecting more elements of a 2015 international deal.

“I… hope that ways can be found to reduce current tensions through dialogue,” International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) director general Yukiya Amano said in a speech opening the agency’s quarterly board of governors meeting.

Speaking later to journalists, Amano said the accord was “under tension” and confirmed that Iran’s “production rate (of uranium) is increasing”, although he could not give an exact figure.

On May 8, Iran announced it no longer considered itself bound to keep to the limits of stocks of heavy water and enriched uranium which were agreed as part of the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA).

Tehran’s move came a year after US President Donald Trump pulled out of the deal. Washington has also reinforced economic sanctions against the Islamic Republic.

Iran has also said that if the other parties to the JCPOA do not speed up work on mitigating the effects of US sanctions, by early July it may stop abiding by restrictions on the level to which it can enrich uranium and on modifications to its Arak heavy water reactor.

In this file photo taken on February 25, 2009 Iranian technicians walk outside the building housing the reactor of the Bushehr nuclear power plant, in the Iranian port town of Bushehr, 1,200 kilometers south of Tehran. (Behrouz Mehri/AFP Files/AFP)

Two weeks ago, the latest inspections report by the IAEA said that while stocks of uranium and heavy water had increased, they were still within the limits set by the JCPOA.

“As I have constantly emphasized, the nuclear-related commitments entered into by Iran under the JCPOA represent a significant gain for nuclear verification,” Amano said.

“It is essential that Iran fully implements its nuclear-related commitments under the JCPOA,” he added.

The latest IAEA report noted that “technical discussions… are ongoing” with Iran in relation to its installation of up to 33 advanced IR-6 centrifuges, but did not specify the content of these discussions.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (L) receives his German counterpart Heiko Maas in the capital Tehran on June 10, 2019. (Photo by ATTA KENARE / AFP)

Also on Monday, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas held talks with his Iranian counterpart Mohammad Javad Zarif in Tehran on the future of the JCPOA.

Maas acknowledged that the economic benefits Tehran hoped for from the deal were now “more difficult to obtain” but urged Iran to fully respect the agreement.

The JCPOA was struck between Iran and six major powers — Britain, China, France, Germany, Russia and the United States — in 2015.

Tensions between Washington and Tehran have worsened in recent weeks.

The United States has beefed up its military presence in the Middle East in response to alleged threats from the Islamic Republic and intelligence provided by Israel’s Mossad spy agency.

Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.

 

Iran warns Europe of consequences if economic ties not normalized

June 10, 2019

Source: Iran warns Europe of consequences if economic ties not normalized | The Times of Israel

Foreign Minister Zarif reiterates 60-day deadline for EU states to grant sanctions relief in order for Tehran to continue adhering to nuclear accord

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (C) answers questions after a meeting with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono at the foreign ministry in Tokyo on May 16, 2019. (Photo by Kazuhiro NOGI / AFP)

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammed Javid Zarif on Sunday warned European countries of consequences if they do not normalize economic relations with Iran as part of the international accord curbing its nuclear program.

“The responsibility of the Europeans and other signatories to the nuclear deal is to normalize the condition for Iran’s economic activities,” Zarif was quoted saying by Iran’s official IRNA news agency.

He did not specify what retaliatory measures Iran would employ, but noted the 60-day deadline it issued last month on the anniversary of US President Donald Trump’s pullout from the nuclear deal and reimposition of sanctions. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said then that Iran would enrich its uranium stockpile closer to weapons-grade levels if the agreement’s European signatories did not grant it sanctions relief in defiance of the United States.

“It is a matter of [the] Islamic Republic of Iran’s plan. We announced our plan by saying that we would do so during the first 60 days, and will take other measures within the next 60 days, and then the following steps will be decided,” Zarif said.

“We will decide proportionate to what they do,” he added.

In this file photo from April 3, 2007, an Iranian flag flutters outside the building housing the reactor of the Bushehr nuclear power plant in the Iranian port town of Bushehr. (Behrouz Mehri/AFP)

He also said Europe was not in a position to criticize Iran over non-nuclear issues, appearing to refer to concerns over Tehran’s missile program and backing for armed groups in the Middle East.

In addition to China and Russia, both allies of Iran, the remaining signatories to the 2015 nuclear deal are the United Kingdom, France and Germany. The three countries have reiterated their continued support for the accord, while also criticizing Iran over its missile work and activities in the region.

Zarif’s warning came just days after Israel’s Channel 13 reported that Israeli intelligence has identified a significant acceleration of work on the production of new uranium centrifuges, as Tehran prepares for the possibility of boosting enrichment activities with the nuclear deal teetering on the edge of collapse.

The intelligence sources were not named, nor were further details provided on the alleged centrifuge production efforts.

The sources cited by the network also said, however, that the Islamic Republic was making back-channel overtures to Washington expressing a willingness to renew talks in a bid to find common ground.

That assessment appeared to agree with statements made by Trump on Thursday.

Speaking after talks in northern France with French President Emmanuel Macron, an ardent supporter of diplomacy with Iran, Trump indicated he could consider talking to Tehran.

US President Donald Trump (R) talks with French President Emmanuel Macron during a ceremony commemorating the 75th anniversary D-Day at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, northwestern France, on June 6, 2019. (Ian Langsdon/Pool/AFP)

“I understand they want to talk and if they want to talk that’s fine,” said Trump, who was in France to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings.

“We’ll talk but the one thing that they can’t have is they can’t have nuclear weapons,” he added.

Trump said when he came to power the Iranians were “undisputed champions of terror,” but indicated activity had slackened in recent times.

“They’re not doing that anymore. They’re doing very poorly as a nation. They’re failing as a nation,” said Trump.

Trump referred to the US sanctions against Iran which are battering the Iranian economy especially since Washington pulled out of the nuclear deal.

“I don’t want them to fail as a nation. We can turn that around very quickly, but the sanctions have been extraordinary,” he said.

On Friday, Washington slapped Tehran with new sanctions, targeting its largest petrochemical company for providing support to the Revolutionary Guard Corps.

Although EU leaders were bitterly angered by Trump’s pullout from the nuclear deal, the US president said he and Macron did not have differences on how to handle Iran.

France’s President Emmanuel Macron, left, meets his Iranian counterpart Hassan Rouhani in New York, September 19, 2017. (AFP Photo/ Ludovic Marin)

Macron said the US shared the same four objectives on Iran — to prevent it obtaining nuclear weapons, reduce its activities in ballistics, contain Iran’s operations in the region and promote regional peace.

The French president said that in order to achieve such objectives “you need to start a negotiation” and applauded Trump’s apparent readiness to hold talks

Iran, however, has rejected the notion of reopening nuclear talks, warning that seeking to broaden an existing landmark treaty could lead to its collapse.

 

Iran’s foreign minister: Netanyahu wants to destroy us, and we will respond 

June 10, 2019

Source: Iran’s foreign minister: Netanyahu wants to destroy us, and we will respond | The Times of Israel

Zarif hosts German counterpart Heiko Maas in Tehran, calls for end to US ‘economic war’ on his country; says Trump peace plan is ‘crime against Middle East’

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, right, and his German counterpart Heiko Maas shake hands for the media prior to their meeting, in Tehran, Iran, June 10, 2019. (Ebrahim Noroozi/AP)

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, right, and his German counterpart Heiko Maas shake hands for the media prior to their meeting, in Tehran, Iran, June 10, 2019. (Ebrahim Noroozi/AP)

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned Monday that Tehran will not remain passive in response to what it says are threats from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to destroy Iran.

“You should ask a regime possessing nuclear weapons about how Netanyahu stands next to the Dimona (reactor), a nuclear weapons site, and says Iran should be destroyed,” Zarif said at a press conference in Tehran alongside visiting German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas.

Israel has long maintained an official position of ambiguity with regards to its nuclear capabilities.

According to Iran’s Tasnim news agency, which provided an English translation of his remarks, Zarif was referring to comments Netanyahu made in August 2018 during a visit to Israel’s secretive nuclear site in Dimona.

At the time Netanyahu warned that those who seek to destroy Israel put themselves in danger of suffering the same fate instead.

The Iranian regime routinely threatens and anticipates the destruction of Israel, and funds and arms anti-Israel terrorist groups in Gaza, the West Bank and Lebanon. Iran’s Supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, frequently refers to Israel as a cancer that must be eradicated, and has set out detailed plans for its elimination.

Israel has repeatedly warned that Iran is seeking a nuclear arsenal in order to destroy it, and Netanyahu has led international opposition to the 2015 P5+1 nuclear deal with Iran.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks at a ceremony renaming the nuclear reactor in Dimona to the Shimon Peres Negev Nuclear Research Center after the late Israeli statesman, on August 29, 2018. (Kobi Gideon/GPO)

“Of course, no one can act against our people without receiving a decisive response,” Zarif said.

“Iran has never waged a war against any country and will not do so in future,” Zarif said, but warned that “if any country starts a war on Iran, it would definitely not be the one that ends it.”

Though Zarif made a point to shake Maas’s hands in front of the cameras, his comments marked a sharp departure for the US-educated diplomat who helped secure the nuclear deal. They came after Maas spoke in support of Israel.

“Israel’s right to exist is part of Germany’s founding principle and is completely non-negotiable,” Maas said. “It is a result of our history and it’s irrevocable and doesn’t just change because I am currently in Tehran.”

Zarif then grew visibly angry, offering a list of Mideast problems ranging from al-Qaida to the bombing of Yemeni civilians he blamed on the US and its allies, including Saudi Arabia.

“If one seeks to talk about instability in this region, those are the other parties who should be held responsible,” Zarif said.

Zarif also offered a series of threats over the ongoing tensions gripping the Persian Gulf. The crisis, he said, stems from US President Donald Trump’s decision over a year ago to withdraw America from Iran’s 2015 nuclear deal with world powers.

“Mr. Trump himself has announced that the US has launched an economic war against Iran,” Zarif said. “The only solution for reducing tensions in this region is stopping that economic war.”

In other comments, Zarif said the US and Israel are the root cause of problems in the Middle East and called Washington’s much-delayed peace plan, which the US has yet to unveil, a “crime against the Middle East.”

For his part, Germany’s Maas insisted his country and other European nations want to find a way to salvage the nuclear deal, which saw Iran limit its enrichment of uranium in exchange for the lifting of economic sanctions.

Iran’s uranium conversion facility near Isfahan, which reprocesses uranium ore concentrate into uranium hexafluoride gas, which is then taken to Natanz and fed into the centrifuges for enrichment, March 30, 2005. (AP/Vahid Salemi)

Maas said his visit was aimed at getting Iran to agree to stay in the deal. Germany is a signatory to the accord. Iranian state TV also reported that Maas would hold talks with President Hassan Rouhani during his visit.

Earlier Monday Iran said that it has given up hope of Europe finding a way to bypass the severe US sanctions in order to maintain enough trade to keep the nuclear treaty in place.

Meanwhile, a July 7 deadline looms for Europe to find a way to save the unraveling deal. Otherwise, Iran has warned it will resume enriching uranium closer to weapons-grade levels.

Abbas Mousavi, spokesman for Iran’s Foreign Ministry, gives a press conference in the capital Tehran on May 28, 2019. (ATTA KENARE / AFP)

“We no longer have any hope to see the INSTEX [Instrument for Supporting Trade Exchanges] in action,” said Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi.

As the US has increased sanctions and companies have been pulling business out of Iran, the Europeans have been developing INSTEX, a complicated barter-type system to skirt direct financial transactions with Iran and so evade possible US sanctions.

“If the mechanism was ever going to work, it would have done so by now,” Mousavi told a press conference according to a translation of his remarks provided by Iran’s Mehr news agency.

“We expected the Europeans to fulfill their obligations to the JCPOA after the US’ withdrawal from the pact,” he said. “However, they either were not able to, or did not want to do so.”

According Mehr, he was referring to a recent visit to Tehran by the German banker Per Fischer, who heads INSTEX.

Mousavi added that in the 60 days since Iran laid down the deadline for increased uranium enrichment there has been no significant change.

“We have not seen any practical move by the Europeans in the past days, and we hope that they will take effective actions in the remaining days,” Mousavi said.

“Otherwise, we will take the second step,” he warned.

“JCPOA is the base of our talks, and we will not discuss anything beyond that,” he said of the nuclear deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. “We strongly believe that the important matter here is the commitment of all the parties to the deal,” he added.

 

The Breakdown on Another Alleged Israeli Air Strike in Syria

June 10, 2019