With almost all votes in, Netanyahu-led right set for decisive victory

Source: With almost all votes in, Netanyahu-led right set for decisive victory | The Times of Israel

Right-wing bloc’s success gives PM edge in forming new government despite Likud tying in seats with Gantz’s Blue and White; New Right and Zehut fail to cross threshold

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses supporters as results in the Israeli general elections are announced at a Likud event in Tel Aviv, early on April 10, 2019. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses supporters as results in the Israeli general elections are announced at a Likud event in Tel Aviv, early on April 10, 2019. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was poised to clinch a clear electoral victory Wednesday morning, with some 95 percent of votes showing his Likud party tied with Blue and White, but the right-wing bloc with a clear lead and Netanyahu possessing a clear path to forming a governing coalition.

With more than four million votes counted as of 8 a.m., Likud had snagged 26.27% of the vote, or 35 seats in the 120-seat legislature — the party’s best result since the 2003 election (when it won 38 seats under Ariel Sharon), and its best under Netanyahu.

Meanwhile Likud’s main rival in the election, the Blue and White party led by Benny Gantz and Yair Lapid, won 25.94% of the vote, which would also give them 35 seats.

In actual numbers, only some 14,000 votes separated the two biggest parties.

Head of the Blue White party Benny Gantz (2L) and his top allies Moshe Ya’alon, Gabi Ashkenazi and Yair Lapid greet their party supporters following the release of election exit polls at the party headquarters in Tel Aviv, on April 09, 2019 (Hadas Parush/FLASH90)

No other party appeared to break double digits in number of seats.

With five right-wing and ultra-Orthodox parties managing to get some 32 seats together, though, Netanyahu seemed set to be able to form a government similar to his current right-wing coalition, with a solid 65 seats.

On the other side of the fence, four left-wing and Arab parties combined for just 20 seats, seemingly putting them in the opposition with Blue and White, pending coalition jostling.

Coming in at a surprising third and fourth places were the ultra-Orthodox parties Shas and United Torah Judaism, with 6.10% (8 seats) and 5.90% (8 seats) respectively.

Rabbi Israel Hager votes for Israel’s parliamentary election at a polling station in Bnei Brak, Israel, Tuesday, April 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

Fifth was the predominantly Arab Hadash-Ta’al with 4.61% or six seats.

Avi Gabbay, leader of the Israeli Labor Party, speaks during an elections campaign event at Rabin Square in Tel Aviv, April 6, 2019. (Tomer Neuberg/Flash90)

The historically dominant Labor Party crashed to sixth place with 4.46% (six seats), the party’s worst showing in its 71-year history.

With five seats each were Yisrael Beytenu (with 4.15%) and the Union of Right-Wing Parties (3.66%).

Meanwhile Meretz (3.64%), Kulanu (3.56%) and Arab party Ra’am-Balad (3.45%) had four seats each.

 

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One Comment on “With almost all votes in, Netanyahu-led right set for decisive victory”

  1. Peter Hofman Says:

    Hamas calls Israeli election outcome irrelevant

    A senior Hamas leader dismisses the outcome of Israel’s election as irrelevant, as near-final results show that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s right-wing bloc has won a clear majority in the Knesset vote.

    “All parties are faces of one coin, the coin of occupation,” says Khalil al-Hayya.

    He said there was “no difference” between the Israeli parties, and pledged that Gaza’s jihadist rulers — who are committed to Israel’s destruction — would continue seeking to “end the occupation and achieve our national goals.”

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/liveblog-april-10-2019/

    Peace or pieces that is the question .


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