KILLER COCKTAIL Syria chemical attack 2018 – what happened in Douma, was a nerve agent used and what have Donald Trump and Russia said?

Aid workers reported dozens of people, many of them young people, were killed by poison gas

By Patrick Knox and Jon Lockett 13th April 2018 Via The Sun

Source Link: 2018 – what happened in Douma, was a nerve agent used and what have Donald Trump and Russia said

{Distrust and verify. – LS}

Aid workers reported dozens of people were killed by poison gas – many of them young children – following the attack on the rebel-held town.

Official sources said at least 70 people had died in the atrocity late on Saturday, April 7, 2018, in the besieged town of Douma.

Patients showed signs of “respiratory distress, central cyanosis, excessive oral foaming, corneal burns, and the emission of chlorine-like odour”, they said.

The statement added civil defence volunteers found 42 casualties dead in their homes “with similar clinical symptoms of excessive oral foaming, cyanosis, and corneal burns”.

Harrowing footage showed victims with yellowed skin crumpled on the ground and foaming at the mouth.

And on April 12, it was revealed that victims of the attack had tested positive for chemicals including chlorine and a nerve agent substance.

US officials who obtained blood and urine samples from victims were said to be “confident” in the intelligence, but not 100 percent sure, MSNBC reported.

Douma is the last remaining opposition-held town in Eastern Ghouta, once the rebels’ main bastion outside Damascus but now ravaged by a seven-week regime assault.

Since February 18, Syrian and Russian forces have waged a fierce military onslaught.

While no one has yet provided evidence of its involvement, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime has been repeatedly accused of using chemical weapons.

America and its allies have reportedly compiled a dossier of intelligence – including images – which indicate that the Syrian government was behind the Douma atrocity.

An emergency two-hour War Cabinet meeting on the evening of April 12 backed the UK joining US strikes against Assad following in response to the attack.

The PM’s top Ministers agreed it was “vital that the use of chemical weapons did not go unchallenged” in the emergency Downing Street summit.

Experts from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), are en-route to Syria and due to begin their probe on Saturday.

They will be working in territory which Russia claimed on Thursday had been completely retaken from Syrian rebels.

On Friday April, 13, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov seemed to prejudge the OPCW investigation before the inspectors even reached the area in question.

He said he was confident the inspectors would find no evidence at all of a chemical attack.

Lavrov called the allegations that one had taken place last weekend in Douma a fabrication by Western intelligence agencies.

How did Donald Trump respond to the chemical attack?

US President Donald Trump warned of a quick, forceful response to the attack.

He pointed the finger at Syria and its ally Russia, both of whom have said there was no evidence that a gas attack even took place.

Trump told military leaders he would take a decision that night or shortly after on a response – and that the US had “a lot of options militarily” on Syria.

He said: “But we can’t let atrocities like we all witnessed… we can’t let that happen in our world.”

Trump initially took to Twitter branding Syrian President Bashar al-Assad a “butcher” and an “animal”.

“Another humanitarian disaster for no reason whatsoever,” before blaming his predecessor Barack Obama.

“If President Obama had crossed his stated Red Line In The Sand, the Syrian disaster would have ended long ago!” Trump wrote. “Animal Assad would have been history!”

Syria and its Russian ally denounced the claims as “fabrications”, with Russia warning of potential “dire consequences” if they were used as a pretext for military action.

Have there been other gas attacks in Syria?

There have been several reports of chemical attacks in recent years. Here are some of the notable cases:

-Dec 2012 – Seven people are killed and dozens injured in Homs by a “poisonous gas” allegedly used by the Syrian regime
-Aug 2013 – More than 1,400 are killed near Damascus in chemical weapons strikes after Syrian troops launch an offensive in the area
-Sep 2014 – Officials says chlorine was used as a weapon “systematically and repeatedly” on villages in north west Syria
-Aug 2015 – Syrian rebels report a chemical weapons attack in a stronghold in northern Aleppo, affecting dozens of people
-Aug and Sep 2016 – Hospital officials and activists in Aleppo say chlorine gas is used in attacks
-Apr 2017 – Warplanes strike the rebel-held town of Khan Sheikhun with a chemical agent, killing at least 83 people

What happened during the attack on Khan Sheikhoun?

More than 85 people, many of them children, died an excruciating death after being gassed by a nerve agent in the Syrian town of Khan Sheikhoun.

Bombs rained down at about 6.30 am local time on April 4 while many people were sleeping.

By the time the White Helmet rescuers arrived they found people having fits and frothing at the mouth.

Video taken at the scene showed civilians sprawled on the ground, some in convulsions, others lifeless.

Rescue workers hosed down the limp bodies of small children, trying to wash away chemicals.

As the name suggests, this particularly nasty chemical concoction targets the human nervous system.

The charity Medecins Sans Frontieres said one of its hospitals in Syria had treated patients “with symptoms – dilated pupils, muscle spasms, involuntary defecation”.

The World Health Organisation said the symptoms were consistent with exposure to a nerve agent.

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